Skin Rashes On Face: Causes And Treatment

Anyone who has suffered from skin rashes on face and neck knows how troublesome they can be. Skin rashes are inconvenient, uncomfortable, and sometimes quite painful. They are also unattractive and often cause embarrassment for the sufferer. Some rashes clear up on their own, while others require medical treatment.

Skin rashes on the face are basically inflammation of the facial skin. A number of things can cause rashes: infections, heat, allergens, immune system disorders, and even medications. Although the skin can resist a variety of assaults, it is also vulnerable to invaders like viruses and bacteria.

Rashes or skin eruptions usually appear on the face with red patches, blisters, itching, dry skin, or a burning sensation. These can affect both the skin’s texture and appearance.

Skin rashes on face and neck are particularly problematic because they cannot be hidden. This raises an aesthetic concern for the sufferer. Face rashes can appear in different shapes, sizes, and colors. The face can appear blotchy with red, pink, or brown spots. Or rashes can arise as visible flat bumps. Some rashes are painful, itchy blisters, while others are simply patches of rough, dry skin.

Facial skin rashes are challenging to diagnose, even for medical professionals. Once a physician identifies the signs and symptoms of a face rash, the underlying cause is easier to spot. Here are several causes of face rashes.

Causes Of Skin Rashes On Face

Heat Rash. Heat rash is the most common skin rash on face and neck. This rash occurs when the body is exposed to extreme heat and humidity. Excessive scratching can worsen this already uncomfortable and itchy condition.

Eczema. Eczema is a skin disorder that can lead to skin inflammation. Eczema may be a reaction to allergens, environmental pollutants, or cosmetics. A common symptom of diabetes, eczema causes swelling, dry skin, and rashes on face and arms.

Contact Dermatitis. Contact dermatitis is another cause of skin rash, on face, chest, and other parts of the body. Contact dermatitis results from exposure to allergens and irritants like pollen, pet dander, chemicals, and foods. When the body comes into contact with that allergen or irritant, the skin responds with rashes or blisters.

Hives. Hives are also caused by an allergic reaction. Various irritants, viruses, insect bites, and even temperature changes can cause hives. Hives are evidenced by red rashes, patchy skin, a burning sensation, and excessive itching.

Herpes Zoster. Also known as shingles, herpes zoster is a viral infection that causes painful, itchy rashes on face and chest. Varicella zoster, commonly known as chicken pox, also causes itchy, burning skin rashes in children and adults.

Rosacea. Rosacea is a chronic skin disorder in adults. This troublesome condition can cause inflammation, redness, and pimples on the nose, cheeks, chin, and forehead. Rosacea looks like acne and, like acne, it tends to flare up periodically.

Infantile Acne. Infantile acne is a common skin rash that appears on the face of infants. Even a newborn baby can have an acne eruption on the nose or cheeks within a few days of birth. Infantile acne occurs due to hormonal changes in the developing fetus, but it soon clears up without treatment.

Treatment For Skin Rashes On Face

Most skin rashes on face and neck are not dangerous, and many clear up on their own. If face rashes become unbearably itchy or cause burning sensations or severely dry skin, over-the-counter medications may help.

Anti-itch creams and lotions usually contain ingredients like camphor, menthol, pramoxine, diphenhydramine, antihistamines, and sometimes moisturizers.

Washing the face frequently will keep it clean and remove allergens and environmental pollutants from the skin. Face rash sufferers can also reduce the occurrence of rashes by avoiding unhealthy products like alcohol, tobacco, processed foods, and other junk food.

When a face rash persists or spreads to other areas of the face or body, it is time to seek medical attention from a general practitioner or dermatologist.

 

Anyone who has suffered from skin rashes on face and neck knows how troublesome they can be. Skin rashes are inconvenient, uncomfortable, and sometimes quite painful. They are also unattractive and often cause embarrassment for the sufferer. Some rashes clear up on their own, while others require medical treatment.

Skin rashes on the face are basically inflammation of the facial skin. A number of things can cause rashes: infections, heat, allergens, immune system disorders, and even medications. Although the skin can resist a variety of assaults, it is also vulnerable to invaders like viruses and bacteria.

Rashes or skin eruptions usually appear on the face with red patches, blisters, itching, dry skin, or a burning sensation. These can affect both the skin’s texture and appearance.

Skin rashes on face and neck are particularly problematic because they cannot be hidden. This raises an aesthetic concern for the sufferer. Face rashes can appear in different shapes, sizes, and colors. The face can appear blotchy with red, pink, or brown spots. Or rashes can arise as visible flat bumps. Some rashes are painful, itchy blisters, while others are simply patches of rough, dry skin.

Facial skin rashes are challenging to diagnose, even for medical professionals. Once a physician identifies the signs and symptoms of a face rash, the underlying cause is easier to spot. Here are several causes of face rashes.

Causes Of Skin Rashes On Face

Heat Rash. Heat rash is the most common skin rash on face and neck. This rash occurs when the body is exposed to extreme heat and humidity. Excessive scratching can worsen this already uncomfortable and itchy condition.

Eczema. Eczema is a skin disorder that can lead to skin inflammation. Eczema may be a reaction to allergens, environmental pollutants, or cosmetics. A common symptom of diabetes, eczema causes swelling, dry skin, and rashes on face and arms.

Contact Dermatitis. Contact dermatitis is another cause of skin rash, on face, chest, and other parts of the body. Contact dermatitis results from exposure to allergens and irritants like pollen, pet dander, chemicals, and foods. When the body comes into contact with that allergen or irritant, the skin responds with rashes or blisters.

Hives. Hives are also caused by an allergic reaction. Various irritants, viruses, insect bites, and even temperature changes can cause hives. Hives are evidenced by red rashes, patchy skin, a burning sensation, and excessive itching.

Herpes Zoster. Also known as shingles, herpes zoster is a viral infection that causes painful, itchy rashes on face and chest. Varicella zoster, commonly known as chicken pox, also causes itchy, burning skin rashes in children and adults.

Rosacea. Rosacea is a chronic skin disorder in adults. This troublesome condition can cause inflammation, redness, and pimples on the nose, cheeks, chin, and forehead. Rosacea looks like acne and, like acne, it tends to flare up periodically.

Infantile Acne. Infantile acne is a common skin rash that appears on the face of infants. Even a newborn baby can have an acne eruption on the nose or cheeks within a few days of birth. Infantile acne occurs due to hormonal changes in the developing fetus, but it soon clears up without treatment.

Treatment For Skin Rashes On Face

Most skin rashes on face and neck are not dangerous, and many clear up on their own. If face rashes become unbearably itchy or cause burning sensations or severely dry skin, over-the-counter medications may help.

Anti-itch creams and lotions usually contain ingredients like camphor, menthol, pramoxine, diphenhydramine, antihistamines, and sometimes moisturizers.

Washing the face frequently will keep it clean and remove allergens and environmental pollutants from the skin. Face rash sufferers can also reduce the occurrence of rashes by avoiding unhealthy products like alcohol, tobacco, processed foods, and other junk food.

When a face rash persists or spreads to other areas of the face or body, it is time to seek medical attention from a general practitioner or dermatologist.

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